The Importance of Embalming

Embalming is the process of sanitizing and chemically treating the body of the deceased. This process reduces the presence and growth of microorganisms, retards the decomposition of the body, and restores an acceptable physical appearance. Embalming retards the decay of the body for a period of time which is often necessary to allow distant family members time to gather.

What is embalming and why is it necessary?

Embalming is the process of sanitizing and chemically treating the body of the deceased. This process reduces the presence and growth of microorganisms, retards the decomposition of the body, and restores an acceptable physical appearance.

Illustration of embalming in ancient Egypt.

The cells of a human body begin decomposition immediately after death. We know that brain cells break down within minutes when they do not receive oxygen. Embalming retards the decay of the body for a period of time which is often necessary to allow distant family members time to gather.

When there is to be viewing of the body, either public or by the family, embalming restores the appearance of the body. This preparation helps modify and remove marks of accidents and disease. The restoration provides an acceptable memory picture of the deceased.

Any concerns you may have about the need for embalming can be discussed with your funeral professional.

 

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How to Donate Your Body in the US

Have you thought about life after death? How about the body you are going to leave behind when you die? Does it even matter to think about it now while you are still alive? The truth is, there are many things you can do with your body after you give your last breath. One of these is to donate your body to science for research and scientific advancement. You can be an organ donor or donate your whole body.